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‘Amsterdam maakt er wat van’ shows new pieces made of used garment

Six Gerrit Rietveld Academie and AMFI alumni showed ‘Circular Fashion’

Six graduated designers presented new pieces made of used garment at ‘Amsterdam makes it count’ during the 27th edition of the Mercedes-Benz FashionWeek Amsterdam. Their collection called “Circular Fashion’ was showed on Sunday night.

How can we recycle waste in a sustainable way in Amsterdam? That is the main topic the municipality focuses on in their campaign called ‘Amsterdam makes it count’.  The city is very aware of the increasing number of people and its consequences for the environment. After a clothing collection at multiple street markets last Kingsday, six Gerrit Rietveld Academy and AMFI alumni selected the fabrics to use items for new outfits. Hans Ubbink, Niels Klavers (Gerrit Rietveld) and Peter Lenferink (AMFI) coached them.

Circular Fashion

The ‘Circular Fashion’ collection was created by the six designers personal inspirations. The show was the kick-off for the awareness campaign ‘Amsterdam makes it count’.  Tees, scarfs, sweaters, costumes, men’s suits and even socks were incorporated in the collections. Britt Beider presented a beautiful lightblue women’s collection by processing typical men’s garment. Marije Seijns collection was composed of multiple leather garments that were painted with figurative prints. On show were a sixties-like denim suit fitted with organic leather elements.

"The six designers created the ‘Circular Fashion’ collections from their personal inspiration"

From braiding to clothing labels

Vita Stasiukynaite used dismantled garment to create new, original patterns to produce business like items. Her assembled dress, trench coat and suit were mainly made of satin scarfs that gave her collection an airy impression. Giving back beauty to used items is what inspired Ariëlle van der Vaart. She showed a powerful collection, in which she used braiding and recycled material out of costumes. Her detailed craftsmanship resulted in stylish, black evening dresses. Standing out was a true ‘ball gown’, in which the hoop skirt was made of dozens of black pieces of clothing.

Transformation of discarded garment

The clothing label was the main focus in Tijme Veldts collection, with which he wanted to make a statement on high end fashion. He created pieces from cheap clothing labels that turned the label itself into a piece of clothing. For Sarah Mayer, the current climate change was the central theme. Her collection focussed on transforming discarder garment into innovative and useful designs. She took an old pair of jeans, painted it black and incorporated long, golden zippers in the side seams. The heads of Mayers models were decorated with blue glitter makeup. Besides that, she showed sporty garment with a lot of circular emblems.

Sarah Meyer. © Team Peter Stigter
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Sarah Meyer. © Team Peter Stigter
Sarah Meyer. © Team Peter Stigter
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Sarah Meyer. © Team Peter Stigter
Vita Stasiukynaite. © Team Peter Stigter
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Vita Stasiukynaite. © Team Peter Stigter
Britt Beider. © Team Peter Stigter
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Britt Beider. © Team Peter Stigter
Britt Beider. © Team Peter Stigter
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Britt Beider. © Team Peter Stigter
Tijme Veldt. © Team Peter Stigter
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Tijme Veldt. © Team Peter Stigter
Tijme Veldt. © Team Peter Stigter
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Tijme Veldt. © Team Peter Stigter
Ariëlle van der Vaart. © Team Peter Stigter
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Ariëlle van der Vaart. © Team Peter Stigter
Ariëlle van der Vaart. © Team Peter Stigter
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Ariëlle van der Vaart. © Team Peter Stigter
Marije Seijns. © Team Peter Stigter
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Marije Seijns. © Team Peter Stigter
Marije Seijns. © Team Peter Stigter
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Marije Seijns. © Team Peter Stigter
De finale. © Team Peter Stigter
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De finale. © Team Peter Stigter
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